Surrogates

How Much Does It Cost to Become a Surrogate Mother?

Before you become a surrogate, you may have one big question: “How much is it to be a surrogate mother?” Learn about all the financial aspects of surrogacy here, including your financial commitment and the standard fees for being a surrogate.

It’s no secret: Pregnancy is expensive.

The good news? When you pursue gestational surrogacy, you don’t have to worry about those costs. You do not have to pay to be a surrogate mother; it will always be a process that is completely free for you.

When you choose to become a surrogate, you will give a great deal to the intended parents in their family-building journey. Not only will you give your body to carry their little one, but you will sacrifice a great deal of your time and energy to have a successful pregnancy and relationship every step of the way. When you do all this, there is absolutely no need to make a financial sacrifice as well. Your cost of being a surrogate will always be “zero.”

That’s not to say there aren’t certain financial and emotional considerations you should make before getting started. Below, learn a bit more about how much it is to be a surrogate mother and what you can expect moving forward.

How Much Does it Cost to Be a Surrogate Mother?

Many women are aware of surrogate base compensation when they start their surrogacy journeys. But, did you know that you’ll receive other payments to ensure the cost of being a surrogate is always completely free to you?

That’s right — in addition to your surrogate compensation (discussed in more depth below), you’ll receive reimbursements and payments throughout your surrogacy to pay for every aspect of the journey. Your medical, legal, and practical costs will always be paid for by your intended parents and your surrogacy professional. They will work tirelessly to ensure that there is no financial cost of being a surrogate for you. That way, you can focus on having a healthy pregnancy and building a relationship with the intended parents — not counting every penny along the way.

When you become a surrogate mother, costs won’t be an issue. You will work closely with your surrogacy professional, a surrogacy attorney and the intended parents to create a detailed surrogacy contract. This contract will lay out all of the expenses associated with pregnancy and surrogacy, and it will detail exactly how those expenses will be covered. When you work with experienced surrogacy professionals, you can know that all of your costs of being a surrogate will be covered from the very beginning.

Remember: If you or someone you know is asking, “How much does being a surrogate cost?” remember that the answer is always “nothing.” Talk with a surrogacy professional for more information on how your surrogate expenses will be covered during this process.

How Much Do They Pay to Be a Surrogate Mother?

You know that being a surrogate will not cost you any money. But, you also know that being a surrogate will financially benefit you, too — in the form of gestational surrogate pay. While compensation shouldn’t be the main motivation for a woman’s surrogacy journey, it can be an attractive advantage of choosing this path.

But, what’s the standard fee to be a surrogate mother? How much can you expect to get paid for your services?

First, know this: Every surrogacy professional is different, which means the standard “fees” for being a surrogate will be different, too. Usually, your compensation rate will be based on your personal situation, including your experience and your state of residence. The best way to learn about surrogate compensation is by speaking with a surrogacy professional.

That being said, most professionals offer an average of $30,000 base compensation to be a gestational carrier. This is money you can do with as you please. You don’t need to use it to cover the medical or practical costs of being a surrogate; you can use it for any purpose you see fit. Many surrogates use this compensation for long-term financial goals such as a down payment on a house, a child’s college savings and more. Compensation is paid out in a set schedule as soon as your pregnancy is confirmed.

This will all be set out in your legal surrogacy contract, as well. So, not only will you not have to pay to be a surrogate, you will actually earn money for your selfless decision.

The Physical and Emotional “Costs” of Being a Surrogate

We’ve covered the financial rewards and costs of being a surrogate — but it’s important to know that there is more to gestational surrogacy than just the money.

When you become a gestational carrier, you will choose to give a year or more of your life to helping someone else become parents. Surrogacy is not easy; you have to commit yourself (and your family) to a journey that will be full of ups and downs along the way. It’s important that you consider the physical and emotional cost of surrogate motherhood before you start this journey.

Every woman’s surrogacy journey is unique, but it’s a good idea to speak with other surrogates before you commit yourself to this process. You should also ask yourself these questions:

  • Am I ready for the physical toll of pregnancy and childbirth? No matter whose child you are carrying, pregnancy and childbirth will require a lot from you. The normal risks of pregnancy apply when you are a gestational carrier, but are those risks worth it to you if you’re not carrying your own child? Be ready to be exhausted and sore at parts in your journey, and remember that every pregnancy experience will be different.
  • Is my family ready to commit to surrogacy? Being a surrogate will affect your family as much as it affects you. When you’re a gestational carrier, you’ll have to give up time to attend surrogacy appointments and build a relationship with the intended parents. This is time that you may otherwise use for your family. Talk with your spouse about how you two will handle parenting responsibilities during the time that you are pregnant with the intended parents’ child.
  • Are you prepared for the emotions of being a surrogate? While gestational carriers rarely get “attached” to the child they are carrying, they still experience a wide range of emotions due to hormones and the ups and downs of the surrogacy process. Pre- and postpartum depression is always a risk, as well as the normal blues of pregnancy. You will need to take steps to protect your mental health, especially when the challenges of surrogacy leave you mentally exhausted.

It’s important to consider all the costs of being a surrogate mother before you get started. But, because every surrogate’s journey is different, the best way to learn more is by contacting a surrogacy professional today. They can answer all of your questions — including “How much does it cost to become a surrogate mother?” — and help you decide whether this is the right path for you.